Siksika Youth Zine

Water and Beyond

This project engages Indigenous youth in the art forms of drawing, painting, collage, and photography in the process of Zine making to be shared through school-based workshops and through a public exhibit. 

Empower

Through the art of Zine making, this project will empower Siksika First Nation youth and surrounding communities with the opportunity to learn and engage in the sacred roles necessary in protecting the Bow River and the community from flooding and drought.

In learning how to create vibrant collage artwork, hand-drawn illustrations, photography and edgy cropped text, the zine will focus on revitalizing these roles and bring forward narratives of Indigenous voices as powerful and necessary in protecting our waterways and dismantling the systemic colonial impacts on water management.

Ahoki

Water

Backgrounder

Flooding of the Bow River in 2013 had devastating impacts on Siksika Nation

134 Siksika homes were lost.

771 residents became homeless.

62% of homes had water supply cut off due to contamination.

The losses and severed road connections traumatized the people of the Siksika Nation (especially its youth), a decade later the community is still rebuilding. Creating new ways to engage and empower youth within the community and offer new vehicles for connecting with those in neighbouring communities is vitally important. Siksika youth are keen to use the zine as an outreach tool to talk about water issues in their community to bring greater public awareness and action, importantly by youth sharing their voice.

As a result of colonization, many sacred relationships have been severed. This project explores and revitalize Indigenous perspectives in order to realize a healthy and sustainable future.

Through outreach to communities surrounding of Siksika Nation, the project examines Alberta’s response to this complex situation with a lack of consideration of social and cultural factors. The 2013 flood continues to have ramifications today not only in material loss, but in creating a social and cultural wedge between communities. Through an arts-based community development approach, this project will create the space needed for safe and respectful conversations around water stewardship and governance. In learning about and revitalizing these roles, we will bring forward narratives of Indigenous voices as powerful and necessary in protecting our waterways and dismantling the systemic colonial impacts on management.

Project Funder